whendoiturnbackintoapumpkin:

Abbeysode of the day (26/57): 4x09 ‘Swiss Diplomacy’

Am I dreaming, or are you talking to me about foreign policy? You’re not worried the sky’s gonna fall down?

"I love science, and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awed by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and reinvigorate it."

— Robert M. Sapolsky (via pridejoyetc)

(Source: utcjonesobservatory, via berrysphase)

theatlantic:

Poverty Is Literally Making People Sick Because They Can’t Afford Food

Income inequality is making us sick.
Well, it’s not making all of us sick. Only the poorest of us. That’s what a new paper in Health Affairs by Hilary Seligman, Ann Bolger, David Guzman, Andrea López, and Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo found they looked at when people go to the hospital for hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).
The basic idea is that people struggling to make it paycheck-to-paycheck (or benefits-to-benefits) might run out of money at the end of the month—and have to cut back on food. If they have diabetes, this hunger could turn into an even more severe health problem: low blood sugar. So we should expect a surge of hypoglycemia cases at the end of each month for low-income people, but not for anybody else.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

Poverty Is Literally Making People Sick Because They Can’t Afford Food

Income inequality is making us sick.

Well, it’s not making all of us sick. Only the poorest of us. That’s what a new paper in Health Affairs by Hilary Seligman, Ann Bolger, David Guzman, Andrea López, and Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo found they looked at when people go to the hospital for hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

The basic idea is that people struggling to make it paycheck-to-paycheck (or benefits-to-benefits) might run out of money at the end of the month—and have to cut back on food. If they have diabetes, this hunger could turn into an even more severe health problem: low blood sugar. So we should expect a surge of hypoglycemia cases at the end of each month for low-income people, but not for anybody else.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

(via supersonic--overdrive)

icuisafourletterword:

Truth! Haha

Anonymous said: As a nurse, what do you think of the Fat Acceptance movement? It sounds good to me as a fat girl but I admit I'm no health expert. Some medical people are for it, some against, you're a cool dude who knows medicine so I wondered what you thought.

pervocracy:

It sounds good to me too.  (Although I am biased, as I am a cool fat dude who knows medicine.) 

Honestly, I don’t even want to bring medical science into it, because I feel like when you do that, you open yourself up to the belief that if anyone can prove that being fat has any negative health effects, then it’s okay to go “MOOOO” at fat people in the street.

When… no.  The health effects of being fat are actually pretty mixed, but I don’t even care.  Fat people’s right to peaceful existence should not depend on the data being in their favor. The whole thing is just a cover for enforcing standards of social status, beauty, and Correct Female Behavior that have nothing to do with health anyway.

Is being fat healthy?  In some ways, but not in others, and anyway measuring people’s lives on a scale of “healthy” to “unhealthy” is terribly imprecise and unhelpful.  Is being fat okay? Yes.

(Source: lokites, via coffeesweetbalm)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Merit-Ptah circa 2700 BCE
Art by J Bea Young (twitter, tumblr)
Merit-Ptah is the first woman known by name in the history of science.  Little is known of her life, but according to the tomb her son created for her in Egypt, Merit-Ptah was “the chief physician.”
A handful of physicians are known by name from this early period and there is some debate over the exact timeline.  Merit-Ptah’s life likely overlapped with that Imhotep, the man most often considered the first named physician in history.  Another male physician, Hesy-Ra, is believed to have lived at around the same time as Merit-Ptah and Imhotep.  Peseshet is sometimes named as the first female physician, but she is likely at least a generation younger than Merit-Ptah, Imhotep, and Hesy-Ra. 
Peseshet was referred to as the “lady overseer of the female physicians” during the Fourth Dynasty of ancient Egypt.  This shows there were a number of female medical professionals working in Egypt 4,600 years ago.  Peseshet is believed to have been involved in gynecological and obstetrical training at the ancient Egyptian medical school at Sais.  An inscription at Sais gives insight to the training of early medical practitioners: "I have come from the medical school at Heliopolis, and have studied at the woman’s school at Sais where the divine mothers have taught me how to cure disease.”

coolchicksfromhistory:

Merit-Ptah circa 2700 BCE

Art by J Bea Young (twitter, tumblr)

Merit-Ptah is the first woman known by name in the history of science.  Little is known of her life, but according to the tomb her son created for her in Egypt, Merit-Ptah was “the chief physician.”

A handful of physicians are known by name from this early period and there is some debate over the exact timeline.  Merit-Ptah’s life likely overlapped with that Imhotep, the man most often considered the first named physician in history.  Another male physician, Hesy-Ra, is believed to have lived at around the same time as Merit-Ptah and Imhotep.  Peseshet is sometimes named as the first female physician, but she is likely at least a generation younger than Merit-Ptah, Imhotep, and Hesy-Ra. 

Peseshet was referred to as the “lady overseer of the female physicians” during the Fourth Dynasty of ancient Egypt.  This shows there were a number of female medical professionals working in Egypt 4,600 years ago.  Peseshet is believed to have been involved in gynecological and obstetrical training at the ancient Egyptian medical school at Sais.  An inscription at Sais gives insight to the training of early medical practitioners: "I have come from the medical school at Heliopolis, and have studied at the woman’s school at Sais where the divine mothers have taught me how to cure disease.”

(via notbecauseofvictories)